Motorcycle Accident Injury Lawyer Foley & Small

Foley & Small has handled many motorcycle accidents. In handling these cases we often hear the other driver testify that he or she looked but did not see our client, the motorcyclist, before the impact. Tragically, these accidents often result in serious injury or even death to the motorcyclist.  

Foley & Small works with experts in the operation, maintenance handling of motorcycles; including those who provide training courses for motorcyclist and would be motorcyclist here in the State of Indiana. Beyond that, Foley & Small works with forensic engineers, civil engineers and human factors experts along with others to prepare these cases to their utmost.

Overview

Despite significant gains since the enactment of Federal motor vehicle and highway safety legislation in the mid 1960's, the annual toll of motorcycle crashes remains tragically high. 

Motorcycle Involvement in Crashes

In 2012, 2,624 of all motorcycles (52%) involved in fatal crashes collided with another type of motor vehicle in transport.  In two-vehicle crashes, 75 percent of the motorcycles involved in motor vehicle traffic crashes collided with the vehicles in the front of them. Only 7 percent were struck in the rear.

Motorcycles are more likely to be involved in fatal collisions with fixed objects than are other vehicles. In 2012, 22 percent of the motorcycles involved in fatal crashes collided with fixed objects, compared to 18 percent for passenger cars, 14 percent for light trucks, and 4 percent for large trucks.

In 2012, there were 2,317 two-vehicle fatal crashes involving a motorcycle and another type of vehicle. In 41 percent (953) of these crashes, the other vehicles were turning left while the motorcycles were going straight, passing, or overtaking other vehicles. Both vehicles were going straight in 524 crashes (23%).

NHTSA considers a crash to be speeding-related if the driver was charged with a speeding-related offense or if an officer indicated that racing, driving too fast for conditions, or exceeding the posted speed limit was a contributing factor in the crash. In 2012, 34 percent of all motorcycle riders involved in fatal crashes were speeding, compared to 22 percent for passenger car drivers, 18 percent for lighttruck drivers, and 8 percent for large-truck drivers.

In 2012, 4,957 motorcyclists were killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes—an increase of 7 percent from the 4,630 motorcyclists killed in 2011. There were 93,000 motorcyclists injured during 2012, a 15-percent increase from 81,000 in 2011.

Ten times more unhelmeted motorcyclists died (1,565) in States without universal helmet laws than in States with universal helmet laws (151 unhelmeted motorcyclist fatalities) in 2014. 

Share the Road Program

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has developed model “Share the Road” language by reviewing materials currently being used by safety, and motorcycle safety agencies and a variety of national organizations that have a vested interest in motorcycle safety. These materials included operator licensing manuals, public service announcements, brochures, pamphlets, posters, and Internet Web sites. The agency identified the common themes and language from these materials that serve to effectively convey the importance of sharing the road safely with motorcyclists.

Indiana ABATE Program 

ABATE of Indiana represents approximately 13% of the registered motorcycles in Indiana, with a membership of over 20,000. ABATE has a full-time staff, 350 volunteer officers, and over 200 certified safety instructors, dedicated to serving the interests of all motorcyclists.ABATE of Indiana's Award Winning Motorcycle Rider Courses
 
Since 1979, ABATE of Indiana has provided quality motorcycle rider education to more than 125,000 motorcyclists in Indiana. ABATE and our motorcycle safety professionals have been recognized with hundreds of state and national awards. Our skilled and dedicated instructors have invested hundreds of hours in developing the skills and techniques to provide a non-threatening learning environment designed to meet the needs of new riders.
 
OPEN TO EVERYONE! You do not need to be a member of ABATE to sign up for a class. A free one-year membership is provided to all students.

 

Safety Points for Car & Truck Drivers Regarding Motorcycles

  • Motorcycles are vehicles with the same rights and privileges as any vehicle on the roadway.
     
  • Allow the motorcyclist a full lane width. Although it may seem as though there is enough room in the traffic lane for an automobile and a motorcycle, remember the motorcycle needs the room to maneuver safely. Do not share the lane.
     
  • Motorcycles are small and may be difficult to see. Motorcycles have a much smaller profile than vehicles, which can make it more difficult to judge the speed and distance of an approaching motorcycle.
     
  • Always signal your intentions before changing lanes or merging with traffic. This allows the motorcyclist to anticipate traffic flow and find a safe lane position.
     
  • Remember that motorcyclists are often hidden in a vehicle’s blind spot or missed in a quick look due to their smaller size. Always make a visual check for motorcycles by checking mirrors and blind spots before entering or leaving a lane of traffic and at intersections.
     
  • Don’t be fooled by a flashing turn signal on a motorcycle – motorcycle signals usually are not self-canceling and riders sometimes forget to turn them off. Wait to be sure the motorcycle is going to turn before you proceed.
     
  • Remember that road conditions that are minor annoyances to motorists can pose major hazards to motorcyclists. Motorcyclists may change speed or adjust their position within a lane suddenly in reaction to road and traffic conditions such as potholes, gravel, wet or slippery surfaces, pavement seams, railroad crossings, and grooved pavement.
     
  • Allow more following distance, three or four seconds, following a motorcycle so the motorcyclist has enough time to maneuver or stop in an emergency. In dry conditions motorcycles can stop more quickly than cars.

Motorcyclist Deaths are Rising.

In 2008, motorcycle rider fatalities increased for the eleventh straight year.

During 2008, more than 5,200 motorcyclists lost their lives in fatal highway crashes.

Fifty percent of all motorcycles involved in fatal crashes collided with another type of motor vehicle in transport. In two-vehicle crashes, 78 percent of the motorcycles involved were struck in the front. Only 5 percent were struck in the rear.

Over 90 percent of all two-vehicle crashes involving a motorcycle and a passenger vehicle in which the motorcycle rider died occurred on non-interstate roadways.

Fifty percent or more of all two-vehicle crashes involving a motorcycle and a passenger vehicle in which the motorcycle rider died were intersection crashes.

In 2007, there were 2,332 two-vehicle fatal crashes involving a motorcycle and another type of vehicle. In 40 percent of these crashes, the other vehicle was turning left while the motorcycle was going straight, passing, or overtaking the vehicle.

Foley & Small Can Help

If you or a family member have been involved in a motorcycle accident, be sure to contact us at Foley & Small.  Click on the link at the top right of this page for a live chat with a member of our staff or email us from our Contact page. You can also call us at 800-276-2525.

We have years of experience and have handled many motorcycle accident claims. We work with experts knowledgeable in accident reconstruction and motorcycle safety. We are staffed and equipped to effectively and efficiently handle such claims.

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